Cover me: winner of the DMU Journalism Magazine Cover Prize revealed

MAGnificent: the contenders in this year’s DMU Journalism cover prize competition

After much chin-stroking and deliberation, we can finally reveal the winner of the DMU Journalism Best Cover competition.

*Drum roll*

Enter Ricky Gervais in a tux and half a lager. There are some rude gags about students who didn’t turn up for their lessons, the perpetually broken coffee machine and lecturers and their bad jokes – and then, thankfully, it’s straight down to business.

Ladies and gentleman.

Finally… we have a winner in the third year PJ3 Best Magazine Cover of the Year competition.

The winner of the DMU Journalism Magazine Cover of 2022, as judged by FourFourTwo writer and deputy editor, Joe Brewin is … Twenty One.

‘IT MAKES ME WANT TO LOOK INSIDE & READ IT’: That was the view of our judge, Joe Brewin, deputy editor of FourFourTwo magazine

Congratulations to third year students Seema Mian, Samantha Johnston, Arabelle Akinfe and Lauren Sadler who scoop the annual prize of £200. (Editor’s note: You have to split that between you, by the way – it’s not each. Sorry.) 

Joe Brewin, who came to DMU earlier in the year to give a talk to students on effective magazine designs, said he was impressed with the quality of work on show this year.

“It was a tough competition to judge and difficult pick a winner,” he said. “It was very tight.”

So what did he make of this year’s cover stars?

“I would say, in summing up, that Adore comes with the good hook of a cover star and some nice lines, but perhaps they’re a little bit lost with the white-on-white design,” he said.

Gen Fem looks smart but is probably a little generic with its offerings on the top strap – I like to know a little bit more on the stories am I actually going to find inside? 

Ocio is probably the strongest in terms of layout and compelling cover lines, but the cover story is perhaps on the weaker side and looks a bit like a travel brochure?

Taboob – fair play on taking the plunge with that name, and it’s arguably the most striking design of the lot on the newsstand. But does it have enough hooks?

“And then Twenty One: this has the best cover shot, and a couple of really solid, compelling cover lines, but perhaps not the best font. 

“So, on that basis, I’m going to very narrowly give it to Twenty One – it’s got some attitude, the colour should pop on a newsstand and, ultimately, it makes me want to go look inside and read the stories.”

Seema Mian, one of the writers/designers of TwentyOne, said she was proud and delighted that her group scooped the award.

“Aw, I just feel so happy to have won this and so proud of the group – Samantha, Lauren and Arabelle.” she said.

WINNERS: The journalists behind Twenty One magazine. From left to right, Lauren Sadler, Samantha Johnston, Seema Mian and Arabelle Akinfe.

“It was a good group, we got on well, we worked hard and there were some good stories and nice designs in Twenty One so I’m so pleased all that has been recognised.

“When I finally received the magazine, it was so satisfying seeing the stories and design in print. It made them come alive. It looked and felt like a proper magazine.

“The girl on the cover is a model. I showed it to her and she was pleased with it she wanted a copy, too. I hope that’s a good sign of how effective it was.”

Girls Night In: A Night to Fight Against Club Drink-Spikers

by Abigail Beresford

Students in Leicester plan to boycott clubs in the city this week, to raise awareness of the ‘scary’ increase of drink spiking cases in clubs.

Campaign group “Girls Night In” took to Instagram to create a social media movement to encourage girls throughout the UK to boycott clubs for one-night only to raise awareness for the growing cases of drink spiking.

“We would like to reinforce that our boycott is not a stay-at-home order. The purpose of our boycott is to encourage all local clubs, bars, and pubs to re-examine their precautions, to ensure that all members of the community can feel safe again,” said a spokesperson for the Girls Night In movement.

“We also want to clarify that our Instagram page is to raise awareness of spiking, whilst also providing a safe platform for people to share their experiences.”

The action of boycotting clubs hopes to make it a legal requirement for nightclubs to thoroughly search guests upon entry, to ensure the safety of those attending.

The movement has created a storm throughout the UK, with 50 locations joining in, including Leicester, Birmingham, and London, to raise awareness of the ever-growing problem and pave the way for a solution.

“We have been taken aback by the continued support and hope that we can all stand in solidarity,” added Girls Night In.

Students in Leicester planned a boycott of clubs on Tuesday(OCT26) night, to stand in solidarity with women up and down the country who have frequently fallen victims of drink spiking cases.

“Personally, I have never been spiked, but I know many girls who have,” said Hannah Phipps, 22, a second-year Interior Design student at De Montfort University.

“It’s scary what is happening right now. When I go on a night out, I want to be able to go out and have a good time, and not ensuring that my thumb has to be over my bottle or focusing on my drink 24/7.”

To sign the petition to make it a legal requirement for nightclubs to thoroughly search guests before entering, visit petition.parliament.uk/petitions/598986.

To see if your local area is participating in the boycott, search @girlsnightin on Instagram, followed by your city.

Survey reopened to help government tackle violence against women and girls

by Abigail Beresford

The Home Office has released an online open consultation to people in England and Wales to help the development of the government’s Tackling Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy.

All genders in England and Wales are being encouraged to participate in the survey, to help inform the development of the government’s next Tackling Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy.

“We are particularly keen to hear from people who may feel underrepresented in previous strategies or who feel their circumstances were not supported by existing services,” said the Home Office.

YouGov conducted a survey which found that 97 per cent of women between the ages of 18-24 said they had been sexually harassed, whilst 80 per cent of all ages said they had experienced sexual harassment in public spaces.

Since the release of this shocking statistic, YouGov has reopened the survey to encourage more girls and women to participate, to depict the reality of how often sexual harassment occurs.

Everyone aged over 16 years old and of various genders are being encouraged to participate in the survey.

To participate in the survey, visit https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/violence-against-women-and-girls-vawg-call-for-evidence.

Police raid parties and issue fines as students flout lockdown restrictions in Covid-hit Leicester

By Laura Murphy and Sarah Danquah

A student who was fined £800 for contravening lockdown laws and attending an illegal party says he doesn’t regret going to the party – he only regrets getting caught.

The 19-year-old student, who was visiting his girlfriend at DMU from his uni in London, was arrested by police after they broke up a huge party in student accommodation.

The incident happened on Saturday night (FEB27) at Inka Studios in Percy Road, near to the University of Leicester. There were more incidents nearer to DMU the previous night.

“We just wanted to be around people and didn’t really think about the virus,” admitted the 19-year-old student, who did not want to be named. 

Young people gather in the street after police put a stop to their illegal party.

“The police turned up at 4 am and shut everything down. I’m not really around people so who could I really pass the virus on to? All the people that are vulnerable are currently being vaccinated anyway.

“If you’re willing to break the law, though, you should be able to face the consequences.”

‘Several illegal parties’

It was one of several illegal parties students held in the city last weekend, according to Leicestershire police. Leicester currently boasts the second highest number of coronavirus cases in the East Midlands.

Similar parties were broken up by police in student households in Dover Street, Marquis Street and Tudor Road, near DMU, on Friday night.

Police estimate more than 100 students had attended the parties and that 35 people were issued with £200 forced penalty fines.

The Friday night party seemed to start in one house and move to others, say neighbours, as the police attended and broke-up gatherings.

Harvey Mills, the director of Cloud Student, the company that owns the student property in this area, said calls were made to police and they attended promptly. Mr Mills called on DMU to crack down on students breaking restrictions.

Residents of Tudor Road were disgusted at the blatant disregard for the rules.

“Some of us have lost our jobs so it’s quite disturbing seeing all these people being inconsiderate and not caring about what is happening around them,” one resident said.

Another resident who witnessed the partying said students were being irresponsible. “Parties like these occupy the police at the weekend,” she said. “The police shouldn’t have to deal with students being inconsiderate.”

A police spokesperson said they will be patrolling the Tudor Road area to prevent other gatherings from happening. 

Will it stop the gatherings? It might not. One student who ran from las weekend’s party and was not caught remains unrepentant.

“I wanted to have fun. I am tired of staying of indoors. I feel like Covid is never ending,” she said.

“I’d definitely go to a party again – not this week but probably next week.”

We asked DMU to comment on this, but they did not respond.

‘Hello again, my dear wife – it’s been a long 20 years…’

The story of how a Zimbabwean family reunited – after nearly two decades apart. Pythias Makonese tells his story.

It is not easy to sustain a marriage when the husband and wife live thousands of miles apart for almost two decades.

A lot marriages would collapsed under these circumstances. Somehow – thanks to the patience of my wife, Nomia, and the help of the Leicester branch of the British Red Cross – we managed to not only keep strong but to re-unite. This is our story.

Nomia Vongai Makonese, 58, a mother of five children landed at Heathrow airport, accompanied by her youngest daughter, Florence, 22, on December 5, 2020. I was there to meet them. At long last, we were together.

This is a story that goes back a long way.

After my teaching qualification, I started work as a teacher in 1978 at a primary school and taught for seven years before I got married. I married Nomia in a Civil Court at Mvuma, Zimbabwe in May 1985. We settled down and raised five children – one boy and four girls.

For 17 years, we lived together and looked after our family. I worked as a teacher. Life was good.

In 1980, there was a change of government in our country as the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU) took over from Rhodesian Front (R.F.) headed by Ian Douglas Smith.  

An opposition political party, Movement for Democratic Change, was formed in 1999 led by Morgen Tsvangirai. Most teachers were aligned to the opposition party and were considered enemies of the then-ruling ZANU. This is allowed in England. It’s the nature of politics in a democracy. It wasn’t in my home country.

Many teachers became political victims. The pressure was so great I felt I had to leave my job, my home, family and move to England. This was 2002 and I had been accused of supporting the MDC when I invited the local parliament (MDC) to an annual general meeting of a School Development Association. 

My story for fear of political persecution was not believed by the Home Office when I applied for refugee protection in the United Kingdom. It took 10 years for the UK to believe me, when I finally won my appeal case.

When I gained refuge protection, I used my news status to try to bring about a family reunion – to bring over my wife and my youngest daughter.

This was refused in 2018. But I was determined and appealed again. This time, I was successful.

Still, it took a whole year – red tape, forms, officials – before we could get the travel documents.

The date was set. April 4, 2020. They were all set to board the plane – and the flight was cancelled because of the COVID pandemic.

The reunion was put back another eight months.

It was the end of a tough chapter for Nomia, raising the couple’s children single-handedly.

“I was just thrilled to meet my husband,” she said. ” I last met him in October 2002 back in Zimbabwe.”

Its as also a joyous day for Florence. “I was only four year old when my father left me and had only a faint idea on how he looks,” she said. “I am very happy to meet him and will be the happiest child on earth to stay with him unlike in the past when I used to talk to him over the phone.”

Florence is now 22, and aims to further her education, and hopes her siblings can join her one day.

It’s been a long and difficult process to get this far. But the lesson here is that no matter how tough it has been, people want to be with the ones they love the most.

If you have that – and the help of the Leicester branch of the Rad Cross – then anything is possible.