Revealed: the front runners in magazine cover prize showdown

These are the gorgeous glossies making a splash in the clash of the covers contest for journalism students at De Montfort University, Leicester.
Six striking designs have made the shortlist in the university’s annual cover prize competition, which is being judged this year by Joe Brewin, deputy editor of FourFourTwo, the world’s biggest football magazine.
Students on DMU’s Journalism degree create print and digital magazines in a final-year project which puts the writing and design skills they have gained during their studies to the test. Each year, the best covers go head to head for a cash prize.
The page-ones to watch in this year’s crop are:

MMXX, a defiantly upbeat magazine showcasing inspiring stories amid the gloom of lockdown, created by Khrista Davis, Mary De-Wind, Beatriz Ferreira, Luke Pawley and Rean Rehman.

Horizon, a contemporary lifestyle magazine telling tales of hope and trauma created by Maryia Lall, Claudia Montague, Temba Ncube, Sonia Raju and Millie Steptoe, which includes a powerful story of a survivor of so-called conversion therapy.


Escape, a socially-aware health and wellbeing magazine with a keen interest in environmental and mental health issues, created by Matthew Childs, Izzi Rix and Abbie Wilkinson, and featuring an in-depth report on women with endometriosis and their long struggles to get diagnosed.


Blood.Sweat.Tears, a modern sports magazine with a focus on football, wrestling, boxing, basketball and tennis, created by Samuel Gill, Adam Rear, Harry Shellard, Oliver Taylor and James Wynn.


Spotlight, an entertainment/culture magazine aimed at Gen Z and millennials created by Savannah Duncan, Samuel Hornsby, Salma Ouaguira Abir and Khadisha Thomas, which boasts an interview with the I May Destroy You star Weruche Opia.


Rivo, an arts and culture magazine created by Rhys Bailey, Victoria Kingsley, Isatou Ndure and Omar Qavi, featuring an in-depth interview with Sex Education star Rakhee Thakrar.

The winning magazine is due to be announced next month, with a £200 prize up for grabs. Journalism programme leader Brian Dodds said: “Each year, I’m struck by the impressively high standard of the magazines produced by our talented students at DMU and this is yet another very strong shortlist of contenders. Well done to them all.”

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Student Nurses at De Montfort University hoped for more face-to-face classes

By Chloe Rowe

 Nurses have spoken out on their desire for more in-person classes after the new term began on January the 11th.

They were amongst the first students to be allowed back on campus due to their high priority, hands-on subject but after being back over a month, it seems students have not been on campus as much as they would like.

Madeline Blunt, 20, who is studying child nursing has said, “I’ve had two in person classes so far, and for this academic year I don’t think we’re having anymore.”

The problem, Miss Blunt pointed out, was that “We’re going on placement and we’ve had two practicals. So, when I go into a hospital, I haven’t had hands on experience, I’ve just watched how to do things on a computer and it’s just not enough to make you feel well equipped.”

With their work placements coming up, the nurses have said the practical and hands-on learning is essential for working in hospitals or other care-giving services.

Abigail Edgar, 18, who is studying mental health nursing has said, “I’d like it more if it were in person. They’ve shown they can have in person classes but almost all my practicals changed to being online. I’ve had maybe ten practicals but only two since I’ve been back.”

The majority of student’s courses are fully online, so this has left the campus relatively empty and yet the student nurses have still not been able to attend more in-person classes.

When asked what Miss Blunt thought of her classes she said, “Teaching is good, just wished we had more in person.”

De Montfort University continues to promote world-improving research

By Auryn White

De Montfort University is the UK’s only Sustainable Development Goal Hub and has been doing ground-breaking work to effectively improve the world.

Sustainable Development Goals (STGs) are 17 goals that were set by the United Nations (UN) in September 2015.

These goals are 17 agreed targets that the world must reach by 2030 to ensure sustainable development for all, including environmental, social and economic standards that must be met.

De Montfort University (DMU) has been allocated STG-16 “to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.”

Simply put, goal 16 is about “peace, justice and strong institutions” and suggests that a society cannot thrive while war is going on. The goal also supports the idea of inclusivity in society and justice for all.

Mark Charlton, Associate Director of Public Engagement and one of the drivers of the project at DMU, said STG-16 is one of the most important of the 17 goals and without its application many of the other goals will not be able to be met.

He said: “STG-16 is crucial as it allows all the others to flourish. If you want to achieve zero poverty, STG-1, then this cannot be achieved in a society at war or facing corruption.”

DMU is joined by 16 other countries representing the rest of the STGs, with one STG being allocated to one establishment in each country. Meetings online have been held among the other countries including India, Greece, Pakistan, Japan, etc.

Despite Covid restrictions, a dialogue has been able to be held between the representative nations. As well as this, before Covid, Mark had attended the UN to present findings on behalf of DMU showing a healthy working relationship within the movement.

STG-16 is also seen as the measure which supports refugee and asylum-seeker communities and promotes equal rights for them.

As a result of this it has attracted many people who belong to these and similar backgrounds, with ZamZam Yusuf, a DMU student and Somalian refugee who fled the country due to war, speaking at the UN about her experiences as a refugee.

DMU has been a part of this project since January 2018 continues to prioritise the promotion of STG-16 and the others for the betterment of the world.

De Montfort University to pilot new Lateral Flow COVID test trial

By Samuel Gill

De Montfort University is set to trial new Lateral Flow antigen tests in the fight against COVID-19.

The university will begin the pilot in the coming weeks with a small group of students who will be given the opportunity to volunteer and take part.

These tests give results in a matter of minutes as opposed to the current 24-48 hour wait time and are utilised to identify those who are infectious but are asymptomatic.

As a result, DMU will potentially help to shape future use of the test in question on a widespread scale as the first institution to take part.

Journalism exams postponed at DMU

By Kira Gibson

The NCTJ (National Council for the Training of Journalists) exams for the single honours journalism course at DMU have been postponed due to the Coronavirus pandemic ongoing currently.

Already scheduled a month later due to the UCU strikes that went on in March, all the exams in April have been cancelled and delayed till later in the year with speculation as to whether the same will happen for the May exam dates.

Tutors are keeping students up to date with what exam dates are being arranged via email.